MistyNites

My Life in Motion

Roys Peak

I could live my whole life in New Zealand, and still have explored only a mere sample of it. There’s simply an overwhelming choice of places to go. As an avid hiker (or tramper, depending on where you’re from), I love getting out into the countryside, no matter where I am in the world. I may have only been there once, but Wanaka in New Zealand’s South Island, remains one of my favourite parts of the country. It is a place of paradise for outdoor lovers. On the bank of a large lake, it is near mountains, glaciers and ski fields. Year round, there is plenty of choice for adventure, whilst remaining much more quiet and idyllic than its better known neighbour, Queenstown.

Lake Wanaka from the shore

Lake Wanaka

The town of Wanaka lays subtly sprawled along the shore round Roys Bay and Bremner Bay and the vista from the waterfront is spectacular. The water sparkles, and the mountains rise up from the far side and as you inhale the air around you, the freshness invades your pores and brings a glow of total happiness to your body.

Looking round the western side of Roys Bay, stands Roys Peak at 1578m, my favourite hike to do in the area. By car, heading round the western edge of Lake Wanaka on Wanaka-Mount Aspiring Road, a car park will be found on the left from where the hike up begins. But even without a car, it is accessible from the town itself.

Lake Wanaka

Roys Peak

For me, I had arrived by bus, and was keen to explore the area on my own two legs. Following the shoreline promenade, a path takes you through the edge of a resort and along the Te Araroa trail which eventually becomes the Waterfall Creek Track. This track follows the lake side all the way round to Glendhu Bay, but long before this, a sign directs you up another track across private land to the road across from the car park which marks the start of the hike.

The path itself for a large part of it is broad enough for a vehicle to drive up it, and livestock can at times be wandering around the area. It gains height in zig-zag fashion, resulting in a steady gain in altitude without a severe gradient. Behind and to the side of you as you work your way up the mountainside, Wanaka gets smaller and smaller, and more of the lake and its surrounding mountains spread out for miles around. Eventually the town disappears out of view and the long main stretch of the lake is visible in its entirety.

Lower Roys Peak

WanakaPath leading along the lower ridge line

About two thirds of the way up, a path leads across a lower neighbouring ridge line and from here, as well as near the top where the path skirts round the northern aspect of the summit, the mountains of Mount Aspiring National Park become visible on the horizon. In every direction the view is unbelievable, and even rounding the summit edge, and reaching the top, it is breathtaking. The lake, the mountains, the town, and pastures spread out around you, and the day I was up there, two peregrine falcons mobbed each other, dipping and diving around those of us at the summit. With a fresh layer of snow on the distant mountains, there was a nip in the air at the summit, but it didn’t deter me from spending a long time up there breathing it all in. It was a popular walk that day, and well worth the effort. On such a clear day, I could see for miles.

Glendhu Bay, Lake Wanaka

Peregrine Falcon

Summit View of Lake Wanaka

Glendhu Bay from near the summit

Lake Wanaka Panorama

I was exceedingly reluctant to leave, but at least on the way down, I was staring out at the changing vista the whole way, and there was a steady stream of people to smile at and say hello to as they worked their way up. I even followed the spur track along the neighbouring ridge line as well. Down at the car park is the only toilet on the whole walk, but retracing your steps takes you back down to the lake side, and back into town for a well earned drink at the pub of your choice.

Lake Wanaka from the ridge line spur track

Wanaka

The view on the way down

The bottom of Roys Peak

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2 thoughts on “Roys Peak

  1. Pingback: Stories from the South Island | MistyNites

  2. Pingback: Weekend Adventures | MistyNites

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