MistyNites

My Life in Motion

Homeward Bound

In the darkness of another cold desert morning, I waited for my ride to a nearby farm where I had signed up for a different kind of Outback sunrise experience: a camel ride across the desert sands. Originally imported into Australia in the 19th century for transportation, many camels were released into the wild when they were no longer of use and now a massive feral population exists in the country, the largest in the World. Due to their potential for environmental damage, the Australian Government has taken steps to keep their numbers in check. In an ironic twist, Australian camels have been exported back to the Middle East for breeding stock and consumption. In Australia itself, some camels have been farmed, and the camels at the Uluru Camel Tours make up the largest working camel farm in Australia. This was to be the last sunrise that I would witness on my great Australian adventure, and it was the coldest I had been on my trip. It still amazed me the extent of contrast between the cold desert nights and the hot desert days.

In the darkness we were introduced to our camel train. Each camel could take two people, so each group were assigned their camel, with myself and a couple of others getting a camel to themselves. I’d never ridden a camel before, although in my past I’ve ridden horses, elephants and an ostrich. I had many layers of clothes on in an effort to keep myself warm, and was grateful that I had a pair of gloves with me. With the battered sun hat I’d purchased in Adelaide, I looked comical as my photo was taken while my camel took to his feet. Once the large group of people were mounted, we were off. It was an hour’s gentle wander through a well marked trail across the red sands to a series of lookout points where we could watch the sun rise above the horizon and light up the now familiar outline of Uluru. The shadows of the camels added to the experience and whilst there was a lot of waiting around whilst people got their photos taken, I actually didn’t mind because the camel behind me kept me entertained as he chewed religiously next to my foot. The second lookout point that we went to gave a view across to Kata Tjuta and both went through the same colour changes I’d seen before. Like each day previous, it was to be another gorgeously sunny day in the Outback.

Photography by Uluru Camel Tours

Photography by Uluru Camel Tours

Photography by Uluru Camel Tours

 

Back at the farm we got a homemade breakfast before we were driven back to the Ayers Rock Resort. I was checked out of the Outback Pioneer Lodge, and had a few hours left before my transfer to the airport. With a plethora of lookout spots to choose from, I’d already made use of several of them over my stay, but one I hadn’t been to was the Uluru lookout which was within walking distance of the lodge. Following a red sandy track across the desert landscape, it felt like I was leaving the resort behind and heading out in to the wilderness, although the occasional noise of traffic told me this wasn’t really the case. I came across a colony of ants bursting up from under the ground and there was so much interesting flora to look at.

 

When I reached the lookout I had it to myself, and proceeded to go snap happy taking all sorts of angles and selfies in a last ditch effort to record this amazing place. There were several points to choose from and I made use of them all. Only when some other people arrived did I leave. A little further along was a war memorial, and from there I cut back to the resort, taking my time admiring the plants, and the birds that accompanied me. I even managed to capture a photograph of a lizard, when normally they would just scurry under a bush before the opportunity arose. When it was time to board the bus to the airport I was sad to leave the place, but I was happy that I’d done it justice.

 

At the little airport, whilst waiting to check in, a trainee ground staff accidentally pressed the wrong button on the computer system and managed to shut down the whole flight whilst I was at the counter. There was a long wait to fix the problem whilst people in the queue became increasingly restless. I’m sure many of them thought I was the hold-up, but eventually the flight got reopened and things got moving again. I had a window seat on my flight to Sydney, and I looked down on both Kata Tjuta and Uluru as we took off, flying past the latter before banking to head east. Like the previous flights, there was a long expanse of desert below, occasionally broken up by large dried lakes. Finally we touched down in Sydney, my favourite city.

 

I always stay in the same place whenever I come to Sydney, the YHA hostel in the Rocks district. Aside from being the best hostel I’ve ever stayed in, not only is it in a prime location, but its rooftop terrace has an awesome view. It was dark when I finally got out to explore. I stuck to Circular Quay and wandered around the waterfront absorbing the view and the atmosphere. It is always a vibrant place to be. I was undecided about dinner, and in the end just ate dessert at the Guylian chocolate cafe.

 

Whenever I visit a place I’ve been before, aside from going to my favourite places, I always try and do something new. My best friend lives in Sydney so we met up for breakfast at one of my favourite cafes, then caught the ferry to Cockatoo Island in Sydney harbour. A UNESCO World Heritage Site, it has been used both as a dockyard and as a convict establishment, and now you can wander amongst the remains of both of these at your leisure. It was an interesting place to walk around, although mainly we were catching up on each other’s lives as we walked. Being in September, there were seagulls everywhere with plenty of chicks around, some of them in rather precarious positions. In the end we went from looking at the historical sites to chick spotting as the birds were everywhere. We sat with a cider in the sun at the little bar, and later before catching the boat back to Circular Quay, we sat at the little cafe near the pier with the Harbour Bridge visible behind us.

 

That night we headed out of town to go to a comedy show. One of the good things about exploring a city with a local is that you get to see places that you wouldn’t normally go to as a tourist. My friend lives south of the city centre, and in the darkness I quickly lost my bearings, and still have no idea where we ended up. It was a good show and a nice end to my last full day in Australia. My friend had plans the next day so I was on my own again for my final hours in the country. My flight wasn’t till the evening, so after checking out, I was quick to jump on a boat to Manly.

The ferry ride over is a great way to view the harbour, and being the weekend, it was busy. I was lucky to get a table at an Italian cafe on the main strip, and had a delicious sandwich and dessert with my coffee for brunch. On my first visit to Manly back in 2012, I did extensive exploration around the nearby national park, but I didn’t have the luxury of time on this occasion, and so stuck to the promenade that hugs Manly beach, and then around the popular coastal track to Shelly Beach. Out here it was sweltering and sunny, and eventually I retreated to the air-conditioned shops for a breather. I got sucked into a donut shop near the ferry terminal and found some shade by Manly Cove to enjoy it.

 

Despite the sun at Manly, the cloud was building up over the city and the wind brought up a bit of spray over the boat on the way back. There was a large market on in the Rocks district and I used the last of my time to walk through it. The market itself was packed but nearby one of the pubs was running Oktoberfest and aside from the crammed outdoor seats, there was an audience of tourists taking photos as the bar staff walked around in lederhosen, carrying large jugs of beer. Eventually though, I retreated to the rooftop terrace of the hostel to stare over the Opera House and the Harbour Bridge one last time. I adore Sydney, and hate to leave it as much as I love to visit it. But after 5.5 weeks, my Australian adventure was over, and now it was just time to head to the airport and head home.

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8 thoughts on “Homeward Bound

  1. You get around don’t you? Not sure about the camel ride as they look kind of cross most of the time. And those green ants? Weird. Love the Sydney pics and especially those of Manly. Stayed for a week and loved it there.

    • Yeah, I effectively circumnavigated Australia on the trip. I wanted to tick off the final state and territory to complete the lot.

      • A great achievement. Where was your favourite place then on the whole trip?

      • Quite difficult to pick a favourite place but definitely found NT to be quite something and the day whale watching in Hervey Bay (QLD) as well as Rottnest Island (WA) were definite highlights.

  2. Love the camel silhouette photo. They’re such comical beasts. We did a short trek in Morocco a few years ago and loved it.

  3. Okay I’m adding that camel tour to my bucket list!!! I’m almost glad I didn’t make it to Uluru first time around now, haha! Sounds like such a great trip. I really miss Australia.

    • It’s an awesome country isn’t it? So much diversity of landscapes and nature. I absolutely loved the Northern Territories and recommend including it on a future visit if you ever make it back.

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