MistyNites

My Life in Motion

Archive for the tag “street art”

Napier Street Art

On my wanderings around Napier, Hawke’s Bay’s main settlement, I was delighted to see the frequent splash of colour adorning many walls. Thanks to the international festival Sea Walls: Murals for Oceans, there was a plethora of murals with a nautical theme, that had been painted the year before in March 2016. Following my visit earlier this year, Napier has held the event again, and there are newer additions to the collection. I’ve really grown to love street art and outdoor murals. My home city of Christchurch has used these to brighten up the many drab walls that have resulted following the earthquakes, and I’ve been pleasantly surprised in a few other cities around the globe to discover more. I found out later that there were others, some of which I was sad to miss out on, but I was glad to find the ones that I did.

Hosier Lane Revisited

Whilst I have no great like for the majority of what constitutes as modern art these days, I have acquired a taste for street art or murals that dot the otherwise bare and drab walls of many modern cities worldwide. Whilst there will always be those that think of it as graffiti, to me there is a big distinction between the two. My home city of Christchurch has been brightened in the aftermath of some devastating natural disasters and the longstanding rebuild that follows, by the colourful, changing and varied depictions that have popped up around the city. Now, when I venture further afield, I notice similar splashes of colour either hidden down alleyways or out in the open for all to see. Melbourne in Victoria, Australia is one such place where I always keep an eye on the walls, and one of its most famous laneways for artwork is Hosier Lane. I visit this place every time I go to Melbourne because the imagery is constantly changing. New images are painted over old, or neighbouring images are incorporated into each other. My last visit was over 2yrs prior, and few of the images from that last visit were evident on this most recent of visits.

Iceland’s Street Art

Whilst it wasn’t something I expected to see on my trip to Iceland, I was pleased to stumble upon a lot of street art murals, especially in the capital Reykjavik. I’ve become a fan of these since my home city of Christchurch has embraced this form of art during its post-earthquake rebuild. Potentially there are more to discover in the parts of the city that I didn’t visit, but there were plenty to see on a wander round.

Seyðisfjörður

Street art in Seyðisfjörður

 

Akureyri

Street Art in Akureyri

 

Borgarnes

Mural in Borgarnes

 

Reykjavik

Mural in Reykjavik

Fisherman mural in Reykjavik

Reykjavik street art

Stamp mural in Reykjavik

House facade in Reykjavik

Mural in Reykjavik

Vampire mural in Reykjavik

Eagle mural in Reykjavik

Crow art in Reykjavik

Glasgow Mural Trail

As my home city of Christchurch continues to rise from the ashes, I have become a fan of the many street art murals that have appeared on the bare walls of new and old buildings alike. With varying styles, themes and colour palates, they grab your attention and make you smile or make you think. So when, after 3.5 years, I made a return trip to the city of my birth in Scotland, I was surprised to discover that the country’s largest city, Glasgow has its own share of street murals.

A great resource for walks in Scotland, both urban and country, is the Walk Highlands website which gives detailed descriptions as well as maps to highlight the route and sights on the way. It was here that I found out about the murals trail and decided to integrate it into a day of sightseeing that I had planned in the city. It’s been 10 years since I lived in Glasgow, and sometimes I think it is just pure fun to play tourist in your own home town, so armed with the directions, I set off.

Having caught the bus into Buchanan Bus Station, it was an easy walk to the recommended starting point on upper Buchanan Street. There is no mural here, but it is a good central place to start and end the trail due to the locality with transport, shopping, and refreshments all nearby. Turning onto West George Street, and heading past George Square, Rogue One and Art Pistol’s Hip-Hop Marionettes adorn the wall near Strathclyde University’s student union. Just beyond here, the walls of Strathclyde University itself have become a massive canvas with a myriad of murals covering the many walls, some at eye level and others spanning the huge multi-floored expanse of the gable-ends.

Lecture Hall, Artist Unknown

Lecture Hall, Artist Unknown

Strathclyde University, Artist Unknown

Strathclyde University, Artist Unknown

Strathclyde Wonderwall, Artist Unknown

Strathclyde Wonderwall, Artist Unknown

Strathclyde Wonderwall, Artist Unknown

Strathclyde Wonderwall, Artist Unknown

Strathclyde Wonderwall, Artist Unknown

Strathclyde Wonderwall, Artist Unknown

Strathclyde Wonderwall, Artist Unknown

Strathclyde Wonderwall, Artist Unknown

Strathclyde Wonderwall, Artist Unknown

Strathclyde Wonderwall, Artist Unknown

Strathclyde Wonderwall, Artist Unknown

Strathclyde Wonderwall, Artist Unknown

Equatorial Telescope, Art Pistol, Rogue One & Ejek

Equatorial Telescope, Art Pistol, Rogue One & Ejek

Land-Ship; Art Pistol, Rogue One and Ejek

Land-Ship; Art Pistol, Rogue One and Ejek

 

Where George Street meets High Street, a short walk to the left revealed one of my favourite murals on the trail, that of an exceptionally realistic painting of a man with a bird on his hand. Retracing my steps back down to High Street, I turned onto Ingram Street, where a little along the way, a massive mural, Fellow Glasgow Residents, overlooked a car park. As beautiful as this mural was, the fact that it was part of an active car park made it difficult to look at it properly, or take photos of it, as there were vehicles parked everywhere. With multiple images within one mural, I feel that it could be looked at multiple times and still not notice every detail.

Fellow Glasgow Residents, Smug

Fellow Glasgow Residents, Smug

Fellow Glasgow Residents, Smug

Fellow Glasgow Residents, Smug

Fellow Glasgow Residents, Smug

Fellow Glasgow Residents, Smug

Fellow Glasgow Residents, Smug

Fellow Glasgow Residents, Smug

Fellow Glasgow Residents, Smug

Fellow Glasgow Residents, Smug

 

At the end of the car park, turning left onto Candleriggs in the heart of the Merchant City, one of the murals painted for the Commonwealth Games of 2014 is very prominent about a block down on the right. At the bottom of the street, turning right onto Trongate, a laneway near an old-fashioned sweet shop hides a very large and colourful spaceman. Turning left on Stockwell street towards the River Clyde, the Clutha bar, unfortunately well known due to a tragic accident involving a helicopter crashing through its roof in 2013, has its outer wall adorned with murals too.

Badminton, Guido Van Helten

Badminton, Guido Van Helten

Space Man, Recoat and Ali Wylie

Space Man, Recoat and Ali Wylie

Clutha Bar; Art Pistol, Rogue One & Ejek

Clutha Bar; Art Pistol, Rogue One & Ejek

Clutha Bar; Art Pistol, Rogue One & Ejek

Clutha Bar; Art Pistol, Rogue One & Ejek

 

Following a brief walk along the Broomielaw, the trail turns up Ropework Lane and onto Howard Street which has a massive mural that curls around the lower portion of the building, round onto Dunlop Street. Again, the parked traffic made it a little difficult to appreciate it all, but it was certainly colourful. Back on the Broomielaw, and over onto the Clyde walkway which forms a promenade along the north bank of the River Clyde, the trail heads west past a large tiger and the amazingly realistic Five Faces that adorn the road side of the five pillars supporting the railway bridge.

Big Birds, Artist Unknown

Big Birds, Artist Unknown

Big Birds, Artist Unknown

Big Birds, Artist Unknown

Big Birds, Artist Unknown

Big Birds, Artist Unknown

Big Birds, Artist Unknown

Big Birds, Artist Unknown

Big Birds, Artist Unknown

Big Birds, Artist Unknown

Big Birds, Artist Unknown

Big Birds, Artist Unknown

Glasgow Tiger, Artist Unknown

Glasgow Tiger, Artist Unknown

Five Faces, Smug

Five Faces, Smug

Five Faces, Smug

Five Faces, Smug

Five Faces, Smug

Five Faces, Smug

Backtracking slightly to head up Jamaica Street, along Argyle Street to the east, and up Mitchel Street, is a mural of a taxi. However, on closer inspection, the mural is not just of the taxi itself, but indeed all the bricks of the wall have been painted on too. Immediately up from here is a large mural of a woman with a magnifying glass and beyond that, the almost ironically placed Wind Power which was partly hidden by the rubbish and refuse of the local businesses. Detouring along Mitchel Lane, a hidden panda appears, and then the trail continues up Mitchel Street further before heading along Gordon Street.

Wind Power, Rogue One & Art Pistol

Wind Power, Rogue One & Art Pistol

Glasgow's Panda, Artist Unknown

Glasgow’s Panda, Artist Unknown

 

Passing Central Station, the train station serving the south of the country, turn left down Hope Street and then right onto Argyle Street where a clever mural appears on the left, almost looking like a noticeboard to begin with until you notice the extras. This one is expansive, along not just one wall, but wrapping around onto York Street. Returning to the Clyde Walkway by the Broomielaw, the supporting structure of the broad M8 motorway is adorned with a massive mural of a swimmer, another piece created for the 2014 Commonwealth Games. This one is so large, it is best appreciated from the other side of the road.

Gallery, Smug

Gallery, Smug

Gallery, Smug

Gallery, Smug

Gallery, Smug

Gallery, Smug

Gallery, Smug

Gallery, Smug

Gallery, Smug

Gallery, Smug

Swimmer, Smug

Swimmer, Smug

 

Heading north, keeping the M8 to the right, the Clydeside Expressway is crossed via a footbridge, and there is a section of the trail with no murals, this route serving merely as a connector between the south and north sections of the trail. Always with the motorway to the right, eventually crossing the busy Sauchiehall Street, a detour past the bank uncovers a crocodile underneath a footpath. Following Sauchiehall Street east until Rose Street, the Cowcaddens underground station is reached via an underpass which is decorated with a mural, as is the underpass on the far side of the underground. From here the trail returns back to Buchanan Street.

Glesga Crocodile, Klingatron & Art Pistol

Glesga Crocodile, Klingatron & Art Pistol

Hand Shadow Puppets, Rogue One

Hand Shadow Puppets, Rogue One

Hand Shadow Puppets, Rogue One

Hand Shadow Puppets, Rogue One

Hand Shadow Puppets, Rogue One

Hand Shadow Puppets, Rogue One

Hand Shadow Puppets, Rogue One

Hand Shadow Puppets, Rogue One

Hand Shadow Puppets, Rogue One

Hand Shadow Puppets, Rogue One

Hand Shadow Puppets, Rogue One

Hand Shadow Puppets, Rogue One

Hand Shadow Puppets, Art Pistol

Hand Shadow Puppets, Rogue One

Hand Shadow Puppets, Rogue One

Hand Shadow Puppets, Rogue One

Hand Shadow Puppets, Rogue One

Hand Shadow Puppets, Rogue One

Shadow Puppet, Art Pistol

Shadow Puppet, Art Pistol

 

According to the website, the distance covered is 9.25km, or 5.75miles. It can be walked in half a day, or can be interspersed with refreshment stops to make it longer. On this particular day, I was playing tourist and visiting some of the city’s major tourist attractions. I incorporated this walk into my sight-seeing, taking detours to attractions where necessary, and therefore I easily made this trail into a fantastic day trip. Since that day, I’ve found so much more street art in Greater Glasgow too, but this trail is definitely a very good starting point. Even without going off the trail to visit attractions, this trail actually offers a reasonable overview of the city, and I think it is a fantastic way to discover the city of my birth.

Mural City

As life starts to wind down towards the inevitable short days of the winter months ahead, I’m spending more time around my hometown of Christchurch on my days off. Having spent many summer days out hiking or exploring the country, I recently spent some much needed down time wandering around the city that continues to pick itself back up again post-earthquakes. After the success and vibrancy of last year’s Spectrum Street Art Festival, I was pleased to see it was running again this year, and especially keen to see the new murals that have popped up around the place. Sadly, many of last year’s have either gone or been hidden, including my favourite, and the most popular, Ballerina. But the rebuild must go on.

Jacob 'Yikes" Ryan & BMD, Hereford Street

Jacob ‘Yikes” Ryan & BMD, Hereford Street

Jacob 'Yikes' Ryan, Hereford Street

Jacob ‘Yikes’ Ryan, Hereford Street

 

BMD, Hereford Street

BMD, Hereford Street

 

Artist Unknown, Cashel Street

Artist Unknown, Cashel Street

 

Toothbrush, Ikarus & Jacob Yikes, Cashel Street

Toothbrush, Ikarus & Jacob Yikes, Cashel Street

 

Artist Unknown, off Colombo Street & Battersea Street

Artist Unknown, off Colombo Street & Battersea Street

 

Embassy, Wongi, Colombo Street

Embassy, Wongi, Colombo Street

 

Love, Artist Unknown, Brougham Street (now gone)

Love, Artist Unknown, Brougham Street (now gone)

 

Artisti Unknown, Hereford Street

Artist Unknown, Hereford Street

 

Figure, Deow, Buchan Stret

Figure, Deow, Buchan Stret

 

Close up, Sofles, St Asaph Street

Close up, Sofles, St Asaph Street

 

Close up, Sofles, St Asaph Street

Close up, Sofles, St Asaph Street

 

Sofles, St Asaph Street

Sofles, St Asaph Street

 

For Madelane, Elliot Frances Stewart, Mollett Street

For Madelane, Elliot Frances Stewart, Mollett Street

 

Splash, Artist Unknown, YMCA Building, Hereford Street

Splash, Artist Unknown, YMCA Building, Hereford Street

 

Monsters, Berst, Gloucester Street

Monsters, Berst, Gloucester Street

 

Vexta, Cashel Street

Vexta, Cashel Street

 

Ikarus, Hereford Street

Ikarus, Hereford Street

 

Multiple Artists, Hereford Street

Multiple Artists, Hereford Street

 

Cookie Monster, Emma, Hereford Street

Cookie Monster, Emma, Hereford Street

 

Ikarus, Hereford Street

Ikarus, Hereford Street

 

Yikes, DTR & Leeya, Hereford Street

Yikes, DTR & Leeya, Hereford Street

 

Artist Unknown, Hereford Street

Artist Unknown, Hereford Street

 

Yikes & DTR, Hereford Street

Yikes & DTR, Hereford Street

 

Late Bloom, Artist Unknown, Hereford Street

Late Bloom, Artist Unknown, Hereford Street

 

RIP Prince, Jacob Yikes, Hereford Street

RIP Prince, Jacob Yikes, Hereford Street

 

Yikes & DTR, Hereford Street

Yikes & DTR, Hereford Street

 

Ikarus, Hereford Street

Ikarus, Hereford Street

 

Jacob Yikes, Hereford Street

Jacob Yikes, Hereford Street

 

Artistic License

My favourite thing to have come out of the Christchurch Rebuild is the ever growing amount of colourful and quirky street art. Adorning the sides of buildings as well as hidden amongst the rubble and desertion, some world-renowned artists have left their mark amongst the city. Unfortunately many of them are on buildings earmarked for eventual demolition, and some will eventually become hidden once new buildings are erected next door, but I hope that as many as possible will remain in the city’s new blueprint. Currently running at the YMCA is the Spectrum Street Art Festival which celebrates this art form and is a showcase for some of these same artist’s work. A map can be obtained from the YMCA and an app is available to download which marks the locations of the current outdoor displays dotted around the CBD. I have become a particular fan of the work of Jacob ‘Yikes’ Ryan who is based in Christchurch and BMD who are based between Australia and New Zealand. Most of the outdoor exhibits are large and hard to miss, but in my wanderings I’ve spotted a few smaller hidden gems.

Giraffing Around, Tess Sheerin, 10 Liverpool St (now gone)

Giraffing Around, Tess Sheerin, 10 Liverpool St (now gone)

Mr 4 Square, Artist Unknown, between Hereford St and Worcester St (now gone)

Mr 4 Square, Artist Unknown, between Hereford St and Worcester St (now gone)

Steeple People, Kay Rosen, Worcester St

Steeple People, Kay Rosen, Worcester St

No!, Tony Fomison, High Street and Manchester St

No!, Tony Fomison, High Street and Manchester St

H.M. The Queen, William Nicholson, Christchurch Casino

H.M. The Queen, William Nicholson, Christchurch Casino

Mexican, Jacob Yikes, Manchester St

Jacob Yikes, Manchester St

Hope, Paulie, YMCA Hereford St

Hope, Paulie, YMCA Hereford St

Face, Drapl, Hereford St YMCA

Drapl, Hereford St YMCA

Love Mural, Artist Unknown, Byron St

Love Mural, Artist Unknown, Byron St

Paris, Askew, Colombo St

Paris, Askew, Colombo St

Jacob Yikes, High St

Jacob Yikes, High St

Wongi and Ikarus, High St

Wongi and Ikarus, High St

Wongi and Ikarus, High St

Wongi and Ikarus, High St

Wongi and Ikarus, High St

Wongi and Ikarus, High St

Buff Monster, Durham St

Buff Monster, Durham St

Tilt, Peterborough St

Tilt, Peterborough St

Daek William, Peterborough St

Daek William, Peterborough St

Adnate, Kilmore St

Adnate, Kilmore St

Askew, Gloucester St

Askew, Gloucester St

Jacob Yikes, Hereford St

Jacob Yikes, Hereford St

Jacob Yikes, Tuam St

Jacob Yikes, Tuam St

Jacob Yikes, Tuam St

Jacob Yikes, Tuam St

Jacob Yikes, Tuam St

Jacob Yikes, Tuam St

Jacob Yikes

Jacob Yikes

Elephants, Owen Dippie, Manchester St

Elephants, Owen Dippie, Manchester St

Wongi Wilson, Manchester St

Wongi Wilson, Manchester St

Artist Unknown, Welles St

Artist Unknown, Welles St

Welcome to Christchurch, Dcypher, Welles St

Welcome to Christchurch, Dcypher, Welles St

Artist Unknown, Southwark St

Artist Unknown, Southwark St

Sef, Southwark St

Sef, Southwark St

Jacob Yikes, between Cashel St and Lichfield St

Jacob Yikes, between Cashel St and Lichfield St

Gary Silipa, Lichfield St

Gary Silipa, Lichfield St

The Black Hat, George Henry, Cashel St (now gone)

The Black Hat, George Henry, Cashel St (now gone)

We Got the Sunshine, Fluro and Oche, Madras St

We Got the Sunshine, Fluro and Oche, Madras St

Save the Penguins, BMD, Worcester St

Save the Penguins, BMD, Worcester St

Hosier Lane

Across the road from Federation Square, nestled between a collection of buildings, lies the apparently unassuming Hosier Lane. Take a wander through it, however, and a world of art is opened up before your eyes. Although evident in many parts of Melbourne, Hosier Lane is crammed with an ever-changing display of street art. This is not graffiti, this is most definitely a highly expressive art form, and it is very impressive.

Post Navigation

%d bloggers like this: