MistyNites

My Life in Motion

Archive for the month “May, 2020”

Escape from Home

At the end of February 2019 I put my back out in spectacular fashion by bending down to put my shoes on. Through the weeks that followed into March and early April, my only relief from constant pain or discomfort was gentle walks and lying on the floor with my legs up the wall. I couldn’t hike, I couldn’t do my beloved exercise classes and even sitting down in the car for longer than ten minutes was out of the question. By the time April hit, I was feeling quite low and claustrophobic, having not been beyond the city limits for a couple of months. I’ve lived with chronic pain for 7 years now, stemming from when I originally injured my back in 2013, and although I’m off painkillers way more than I’m on them, it has definitely had an influence on my mood. To top it off, I’ve been tackling anxiety for four years, and the two together found me feeling very down this time last year.

But as April moved onwards, relief came and I was finally able to consider going for a drive and getting out of the city. After coping with a drive out to Little River on the Banks Peninsula, I was able to tolerate going further a few days later and headed round to Akaroa Harbour 1.5hrs away. It was a grey and cool day, but I was so grateful to change my horizons and walk somewhere different. My partner was getting on with his recovery too, having had shoulder surgery in February, and deemed recovered enough to fly, he headed off to the States for a few weeks to catch up with friends, leaving me behind.

 

When ANZAC day came around, my mind was screaming to get away somewhere, so I decided to take a day trip to Kaikoura. My plan was to enjoy the drive, test my back out and see some wildlife as a reward. It was a gorgeous sunny day and I was glad that my back coped with being seated so long. I headed straight to the peninsula on arriving and parked up on a rock to watch the adults sleeping and the pups playing in rock pools. But what was supposed to be an uplifting trip to pull me out of my pity party, ended up being highly frustrating as I watched tourist after tourist ignoring the distance rule and actively harassing the pups to get selfies. In particular, two guys forced themselves right in the face of one pup, practically touching it to get it to look in their camera. I was livid, and the multiple repeat offenders succeeded in winding me up. I left for home, more aggravated than relaxed.

 

It wasn’t till two weeks later into May that I came to realise how much the constant discomfort and cabin fever had affected me, but I was finally able to let go of it all when I decided to give Air BnB a go, and picked a part of Canterbury to get away to that I’d never visited before. Nearly 4hrs away in South Canterbury, Otematata is nestled towards one end of the Waitaki Valley. It was the last month of autumn which I hadn’t really given much thought to until I reached the valley from Kurow and found myself among an increasingly colourful landscape. It started off subtly as I reached Lake Waitaki, becoming a bit more noticeable as I reached the dam at the eastern end of Lake Aviemore and then popping into full glory as I reached Otematata itself. The little settlement didn’t amount to much, but I had a cute little apartment to spend a couple of nights in, and my host had helpfully given me an idea of some walks to do in the immediate region.

I’d lost a good chunk of my fitness, but thankfully my first walk was almost flat. Starting up the road to Lake Benmore which was lined by yellow trees, I passed the golf course which struck an incredible likeness to the Speyside region of Scotland. It immediately transported me to memories of my childhood on family holidays, and as I marvelled in the autumn glory, I finally felt myself relax a little, and weeks of pent up frustrations finally began to ease. I was only limited by the remaining hours of daylight, so I wasn’t particularly fast about my walk as I was constantly stopping to try and capture an image of the gorgeous colours around me. A pond beyond the golf course cast reflections of the autumn leaves, and shortly after that, the path cut down into a woodland where I was immediately traipsing through a carpet of fallen leaves.

 

New Zealand is full of Scottish names and Lake Aviemore was one of these places. The expansive lake could be found after a wander among the leaves and the end by Otematata was inundated with black swans and scaup. The lowering autumn light caused the mountains on the far side to glow and I felt like I was walking through an autumnal wonderland. The marshy ground at the lake edge inferred the lake had flooded recently and I had to take a couple of small detours to avoid getting my feet wet. Some way along the shore, I found myself at a camping park and boat ramp and here, a track led up a little spit of land to give another view across the lake. There was an abundance of fallen yellow leaves to kick through as I headed back to my apartment for the night.

 

The next morning, I took a different route through the same lakeside woodland where I found a small lake with another stunning reflection. There was also a hoard of bright orange berries everywhere I looked. The same road that had led me to this walk continued on through a valley of colourful foliage to Benmore Dam, a large manmade construction that walled up the end of Lake Benmore, another large lake in the region. My host had recommended the walk round the peninsula, so I followed the signs to the car park which was quite busy, and set off through the pine forest. Once again, I felt transported back to Scotland. The feeling only lasted until I got my first views of Lake Benmore, as the blue colour of the water reminded me I was in New Zealand. The lakes of mid-Canterbury are all such a stunning blue colour which I’ve never seen in any other country. The overcast weather dulled the blue here somewhat, but that didn’t detract from the view. As I climbed up and over a ridge, I was suddenly presented with the main expanse of the lake, and behind it rolling hills were framed by the snowy peaks of the Southern Alps.

 

The track took a circuit across the ridges, eventually presenting a turn-off to a lookout where a well placed bench offered a grand vista. It was occupied when I arrived, and after a brief chat with the two men, I found a nearby rock to park my bum and I sat for a long time just soaking up the view. After a while, I returned to the main trail which cut back into the forest briefly before opening up to see the lake again as it descended a little on the circuit. The track was well formed but in places had loose stones on the surface and I lost my grip in one spot, falling over and tearing a small hole in my clothes. I got a nice bruise on my knee too, but it wasn’t enough to dampen my day. As the loop turned back towards the carpark, it descended once more into the forest and the view was lost for most of the return leg.

 

I took the long road home, crossing Benmore dam and marvelling at the immensity of it, before continuing back towards Lake Aviemore, finding myself on the far bank from Otematata. It felt desolate here, with only the occasional passing car and little in the way of interest. It varied in its proximity to the lake itself with few places to stop and admire it. A campsite did offer a short walk along the lake shore before I pushed on to a walk that I’d spotted online. Some way towards the Lake Aviemore dam, I pulled in by a bridge and took a track that headed up a river. The grey skies cast the water a steely grey colour and it felt still and quiet walking here. I had the place completely to myself, as I followed the track to a small picnic area and then beyond. The track on the map stopped, but the track in reality continued, so I followed the river further upstream, not sure where it would take me. All of a sudden it just stopped some distance beyond what the map had shown. When I returned to the picnic site I was joined by a fantail, one of my favourite forest birds. They flit flit flit between the branches and are exceedingly difficult to photograph as they hate to sit still, but they’re quite bold little birds and they like to interact. I completed the drive to the dam at the far end of Lake Aviemore, and with the intention of going to the hot tubs, I took the long drive to Omarama on the inland road. But when I got there, it was dull and cold, and I changed my mind. I returned to my apartment after stopping off at another campsite for a stretch of the legs once more among some autumn colours.

 

I had a full day to make my return to Christchurch, and with the Waitaki Valley being part of the Whitestone Geopark, there was plenty of stop-offs to be made on route. Sadly it was another grey day but that wasn’t to stop me getting out into the fresh air. Driving into Kurow, I parked up in a cul-de-sac at the start of the Kurow Hill Walkway, a locally-managed track that led up the steep hillside. Zig-zagging up the hillside for over 1km, there are a host of armchairs that have been placed to take a break on, although they all looked mouldy and sodden as I passed them by. It didn’t take long for the views of the valley to open up as the altitude gain was acquired, and from the top of the hill I could see the braided Waitaki river disappearing off in both directions. The cloud hugged the hillside on the far expanse of the river and the small town of Kurow lay spread out immediately below.

Along the road near Duntroon was the first of a few rock art sites that I stopped at. Similar to that of the Indigenous Australians, the early Maori who inhabited the area drew pictures on the rocks. The ones here were under an overhang of limestone rock, and although they weren’t always clear what they were, I could make out a sailed boat or waka canoe in one of them. Duntroon had a lovely little wetland out the back of it which had a walkway leading through. There was just me and a local there and I was enjoying being in a part of the country that isn’t frequented by tourists. Although a year later its a mute point in a post-COVID World, prior to any knowledge of the chaos that was to come, it could be hard at times not to get frustrated with the crowds that descend on some of my favourite parts of the country. Back on the main road, there was evidence of the white stone that gives the geopark its name. The famous Oamaru stone was evident here in the form of a couple of statues and a gorgeous white stone church.

Cutting inland from Duntroon, I took Earthquake Road to visit a spot where an upthrust had created a limestone cliff where a whale’s skull was uncovered. The site itself was a little underwhelming but the road led me round to the turn-off to Elephant Rocks, a place I hadn’t heard of before this trip. The giant boulders of Castle Hill in Arthur’s Pass are well known to local and tourist alike, being a popular stop-off on the road from coast to coast. But looking very similar, only hidden down a country road in South Canterbury, the Elephant Rocks felt like a secret spot. I wasn’t alone there though, but it felt far from crowded and it was peaceful to wander around there among the giant rocks. The site is part of a working farm, and just across the fence some curious cows watched those of us who wandered there.

I completed my tour of the Whitestone Geopark by visiting Anatani not far from the rocks. Here, some fossils had been discovered and were on display but I was more interested in the rock formations and the harrier hawk that was circling through the valley. Heading back to the main road there was another short walk to another spot where there was historic rock art. It was less discernible and a smaller site than the first place I’d stopped so it didn’t hold my attention for long. To break up the long drive from here back to Christchurch, I decided to stop at Riverstone, a place off State Highway 1 that I’d ignored time and time again, and was finally curious enough to explore. I was immediately shocked to find a large white-stone castle at the back of the complex. I’d planned on stopping for a late lunch at the restaurant I’d heard so much about, but was instead presented with not just the castle, but a lovely little garden to wander through, a pond with ducks (and inflatable flamingos!) to look at, and a myriad of eclectic and jam-packed brick-a-brack stores to peruse through, never mind the delicious food to eat at the restaurant. The whole weekend had been just what I’d needed to perk up my sad soul, and the unassuming Waitaki Valley had more than delivered.

Life at Home

The day I arrived home from Tanzania, my partner went into hospital to have surgery. I managed to get a decent sleep and get out to stretch my legs, and I even felt energised enough to get to an exercise class before visiting him that evening as he recovered. I had the next day off work, and was tasked with picking him up that morning, as well as being his nursing aide as he was rendered limited by an unusable arm for the weeks ahead. He had torn his rotator cuff in his shoulder and he wouldn’t be able to lift his arm or take weight for some time. Picking him up should have been a straight forward task, but as I bent down to put my shoes on, I was suddenly hit like a brick with excruciating pain and I immediately fell to my knees, crying out and swearing as the pain repetitively shot from my lower back. The tears immediately started rolling down my face and with every attempted movement, more pain kept coming. I was stuck on the floor, writhing and swearing. I tried to get up but that was the worst pain of all. I had to get to my feet, there was no getting round that fact, so through screams, I forced myself upright, reeling as I made it to my feet, rushing as well as I could to the first aid kit to grab some painkillers. I took all that I safely could from what I had, and found myself unsure what to do next.

With my partner relying on me and a very stubborn streak to contend with, I grabbed my keys, and went out to my car. Opening the door was the easy part, but as I tried to sit down, the incessant throbbing became a crescendo once more and I got into the drivers seat with more tears running down my face. I spent the entire drive to the hospital groaning, tears continuing to fall out. I panted incessantly, trying to use my breathing to ease the pain. I’ve put my back out before, but the circumstances surrounding this time made this ten times worse. When I arrived, the nurse asked me to help dress my partner and it suddenly became clear that my role as his nurse was going to be a bit of problem. He had a working back and one arm, and I had two working arms but a bad back. In hindsight, it was the most comical thing that a stranger could have witnessed.

As a contractor with no sick pay, I had to go back to work the next day. What followed were days of physio strapping, pain with sitting and driving and a restricted ability to lift things. My only relief was walking. It had been the same the last time I’d put my back out in 2013, so whilst my sports were completely out of the question, I made a point of walking on my days off work, the gentle movement giving me some relief from the constant ache that came with sitting and standing still. Thankfully, it was still summer, so there were some beautiful days of sunshine to enjoy, and being last year before any concept of coronavirus could ever have been fathomable, there were still events going on in my home city of Christchurch.

The Garden City, made famous by a devastating and destructive earthquake in 2011, has changed so much in the years that I have lived there. There is still so much to complete, but the city is a hive of activity once more, and parts of it have been completely revitalised. That first weekend, my partner and I headed into the city, him with his arm in a sling, and me eager to get mobile. It was the opening day for the Christchurch Town Hall which had had a massive renovation inside. This was my first chance to get inside the building, and there was a good crowd of locals reminiscing and marvelling as the tour went round. Outside the streets were busy and we wandered down to the Avon River where the Terraces and Cashel Mall make up one of the completed parts of the city. The Terraces are a mish-mash of building styles, and whilst not aesthetically to my taste, it has become a popular spot for drinks and a bite. The iconic Christchurch trams trundled below the balconies and the city felt alive.

 

The dominating structure of the Bridge of Remembrance marked one end of the Christchurch Lantern Festival’s displays for Chinese New Year. Whereas they had been pulling them down in Sydney the weekend before, they were still in full swing in my home town, and although we wandered round some of them during the day, it was at night that they really came to life. Needing no excuse to go for a walk, we headed back into the city in the dark, to experience them in all their glory. Lining both sides of the Avon River as well as within the river itself, there were plenty of lanterns to look at, and there was a good crowd of people enjoying it all.

 

After my initial reservations about moving to Christchurch in 2012, back when it was still sealed off and desolate, reeling from the grief and loss of that earthquake, I’ve come to love the city and been proud of its progress and what it has to offer. So on 15th March 2019, when news reached my work of a terrorist attack in the city, I was dumbfounded. In the days and weeks that followed, I proudly watched as my city rallied and came together, united in shock and defiance, publicly rejecting the ideology that had led to that heinous act. We spent weekends joining the crowds of people reading messages among the flowers, and joining vigils. We remained unafraid to go out and move around, and we continued to make the most of the city that was open around us.

 

In April, Evans Pass road, the final link between Sumner and Lyttelton, reopened after eight years. We took a drive through the tunnel to Lyttelton on a gorgeous sunny autumn day, and drove up and over to Summit Road, looping round and stopping at the various lookout points. It gave a whole new view of the harbour, including a direct view down onto Lyttelton Port, where the wharf was covered in colourful containers. We watched the port in action for a while before heading round to the Lyttelton Timeball, another place to reopen after extensive earthquake repairs. Originally completed in 1876, the historic structure was created to allow sailors of the time to check the accuracy of their chronometers, the ball set to drop at a predetermined time every day. Although you can’t go into the building, its elevated position gives yet another differing viewpoint of the blue harbour below.

 

A few weeks later we took a trip up the Christchurch Gondola, a favourite activity to do in the winter months when I don’t tend to hike much. An annual pass means I can go up as often as I like, and another sunny autumn day was the perfect excuse to go up. The views along the Port Hills are incredible, but the top of Mt Cavendish where the gondola top station is, is particularly special. Looking north, Pegasus Bay sweeps away from the city in a beautiful arc, the distant views of the Southern Alps snaking off to meet it. On the other side of the building, Banks Peninsula and Lyttelton Harbour make up the view and whether the tide is in or out, the colour of the water is always stunning. I will never tire of this view, no matter how many times I head up to the summit, and it is one of many reasons why I love living here.

 

And to prove how much I’ve made a home for myself here, I finally got round to planting my citizenship tree in late April 2019. In New Zealand, newly appointed citizens are gifted a native tree that you can plant as a symbol of laying roots. I’d gotten my citizenship in December 2018, and my plant had sat on the dining room table for months. Finally, my partner and I headed down to the community garden to plant it. I wandered around for a while, trying to find the perfect spot when suddenly a New Zealand fantail flitted excitedly around us as we stood in one particular spot. This was to be where I was to plant it. I’m not religious or spiritual, but this was as good a sign as any, and the bird chirped in the nearby branches around us as we dug a hole and laid my roots. Despite missing my family and aspects of my life back in Scotland, I’ve never doubted for a minute that New Zealand is where I was meant to be. Christchurch is my home, and I continue to be very proud of its progress and happy to enjoy all that it offers me.

Jumping Continents

It took 40hrs to get home from Tanzania and I was exhausted at the end of it all. But with the route required to travel, it was a great opportunity to catch up with my best friend who was living in Sydney at the time. Over a year on, I have no memory of the flight from Kilimanjaro International Airport to Doha in Qatar, but I had read that Qatar Airlines offer complimentary hotel rooms for passengers with an 8hr or longer layover. My layover was 8hrs, so on arrival I headed to the desk to organise it, only to be told that I hadn’t paid enough for my ticket to qualify. In other words, I wasn’t a valued enough customer, and deflated and tired, I was pointed in the direction of the airport’s ‘Quiet Lounge’ to try and get some kip. Apparently though, some of the other users of the gender-specific room had no concept of what quiet meant, and with no hope of sleep, I grew increasingly frustrated at the sounds of people babbling away with their companions in a language I didn’t understand. The time passed so slowly, and eventually I decided to go in search of coffee, finding a rather distasteful brew in a food court, and gaining some Qatari money as change from my US Dollar payment.

At last the Sydney flight was boarding but as is often the case, I could not sleep on the plane, and at around 14hrs of flying, I found myself in Sydney a little after 6am feeling like a smelly, sweaty zombie. But I love Sydney, and it was a sunny day so it wasn’t hard to be happy there. As a New Zealand citizen, I skipped through customs in no time at all, and quick as a flash I found myself at Circular Quay, emerging into the morning sunlight, the crowds not yet having arrived for the day. I will never tire of the view of the Sydney Harbour Bridge and Opera House, and was happy to pass a bit of time here before heading into the city a little to meet my friend for coffee.

Like many places that I have returned to, I have my favourite haunts and visiting these aside, I’m also always keen to experience something new. Bar Bellaccino near Wynyard Station is a favourite cafe to visit here, tucked just below street level in an unassuming building. Tables are at a premium here, but we were lucky to get a space to sit and have a catch up. I had a 12hr layover ahead of my flight home to Christchurch that evening, so there was plenty of time to spend with each other. It was the lead up to Mardi Gras, a huge event in the Sydney social calendar, so as we took a walk from the cafe, there were some temporary artworks dotted about the plazas.

Barangaroo Reserve had been overhauled since I’d last been round that way, so we meandered through the city streets to pop out there, taking our time to watch the comings and goings of the river traffic. It was shaping up to be a scorching day with not a cloud in the sky. I’d come from the African heat but it was still intense on my tired body. After hanging around watching Sydney come to life for the day, we cut down to the waterfront and meandered round to Darling Harbour, where the remains of the Chinese Lantern Festival were gradually being dismantled.

At the back of Tumbalong Park, we found ourselves at the Chinese Garden of Friendship. I’d never gone in there before, having walked past its walls a few times and paying it little attention. On the recommendation of my friend, we went inside and I was very glad we did. Despite the heat, it was a peaceful oasis from the bustling city beyond its walls. Although framed by the tall office blocks and apartments behind it, they added to the view rather than detracted from it. With waterways filled with fish, and water dragons wandering around the foliage, it was a great spot for nature watching. The centre piece is a large pond, framed by willows and evergreens. Rockeries create waterfalls off to the side and raised above it all is a pagoda housing a bell.

 

We became paparazzi for every water dragon that we spotted. I don’t care how many times I see them in Australia, I love the lizards there. Large dragonflies hung out around the reeds at the pond edge, and colourful flowers bloomed in pockets. The path curved round a frangipani tree, which has my favourite flower and a myriad of waterlilies floated nearby. As we completed the circuit round the pond, some people were feeding the fish, and they congregated in large numbers by the edge, yet another water dragon close by in hopes of getting a free feed too. The Chinese New Year had just been celebrated, and a frame had been set up to tie your wish for the Year of the Pig. Most of them were for health and happiness, but I laughed when I read ‘To crush my enemies, see them driven before me, and to hear the lamentations of their woman’.

 

As we left the gardens behind, we came across a colourful mural on the far side of Darling Quarter. Away from the touristy areas, I could get lost if it wasn’t for my friend’s local knowledge. There was an LGBTQ festival on that day, and I let my friend lead me there. We walked for a bit then got on a bus for a bit, and when we finally arrived, it was all hustle and bustle. It was a fun experience, tainted only by the intense heat that had built up under a cloudless sky. I was struggling a little due to my undertone of tiredness, but I’m glad we went. There were people dressed up, lots of photo opportunities and food and drink to be had. I wouldn’t have even known it was on if it weren’t for my friend being a local, and after getting our fill, we found a spot in the shade to take a breather for a while, my tiredness threatening to overwhelm me.

 

After a while we took a walk to Redfern, passing more street murals, eventually arriving in a part of the city I was a little more familiar with from previous visits. We grabbed burgers from a local eatery as my time in Sydney ticked down, and soon it was time for me to head back to the airport to fly home. My plane took off as the sun was preparing to set and with a window seat, I was worried I would miss the light to catch the city views. As luck would have it, there was enough light to see by, and as it circled on ascent, I was excited to see we were flying almost directly above the harbour, and for the first time ever, I got a direct view down over the Opera House and Harbour Bridge from above. It was the perfect end to a lovely layover in my favourite city in the whole World, but after two weeks on the go in Tanzania, and one of the longest transit times I’d ever experienced, I was excited to get home to my bed to sleep.

Wildlife of Tanzania

From the open-spaces of the African Plains, to the slopes of the continent’s highest mountain, I saw an incredible array of wildlife in Tanzania. While the Serengeti is probably well known to a lot of people, a regular backdrop of wildlife documentaries, there is more to Tanzania than just this national park, although it offered me so much in terms of incredible sightings. Across three national parks (Kilimanjaro, Lake Manyara and Serengeti) as well as one conservation area (Ngorongoro), I had an incredible two weeks in a country that I found to be full of some very friendly and welcoming people. It was my second time in the African continent and this trip did not disappoint. From Africa’s Big Five to some of its smallest creatures, I was ecstatic with all that I saw.

 

MAMMALS

Warthogs

Sightings: Lake Manyara NP, Serengeti NP

 

Olive Baboon

Sightings: Lake Manyara NP

 

Manyara (Blue) Monkey

Sightings: Lake Manyara NP

 

(Hilgert’s) Vervet Monkey

Sightings: Lake Manyara NP

 

Common Impala

Sightings: Lake Manyara NP, Serengeti NP, Ngorongoro Conservation Area

 

Wildebeest

Sightings: Lake Manyara NP, Serengeti NP, Ngorongoro Conservation Area

 

African Buffalo

Sightings: Lake Manyara NP, Ngorongoro Conservation Area

 

Plains Zebra

Sightings: Lake Manyara NP, Serengeti NP, Ngorongoro Conservation Area

 

Giraffe

Sightings: Lake Manyara NP, Serengeti NP, Ngorongoro Conservation Area

 

Bushbuck

Sightings: Lake Manyara NP

 

African Savannah Elephant

Sightings: Lake Manyara NP, Serengeti NP, Ngorongoro Conservation Area

 

Black Rhino

Sightings: Ngorongoro Conservation Area

 

Southern Grant’s Gazelle

Sightings: Ngorongoro Conservation Area

 

Thomsons Gazelle

Sightings: Serengeti NP, Ngorongoro Conservation Area

 

Eland

Sightings: Serengeti NP, Ngorongoro Conservation Area

 

Topi

Sightings: Serengeti NP

 

African Lion

Sightings: Serengeti NP, Ngorongoro Conservation Area

 

Leopard

Sightings: Serengeti NP

 

Rock Hyrax

Sightings: Serengeti NP

 

Cheetah

Sightings: Serengeti NP

 

Hyena

Sightings: Serengeti NP, Ngorongoro Conservation Area

 

Dik Dik

Sightings: Serengeti NP

 

Hippo

Sightings: Serengeti NP, Ngorongoro Conservation Area

 

Mongoose

Sightings: Serengeti NP

 

Rat

Sightings: Arusha, Serengeti NP

 

Serval Cat

Sightings: Serengeti NP, Ngorongoro Conservation Area

 

Golden Jackal

Sightings: Ngorongoro Conservation Area

 

BIRDS

Streaky Seedeater

Sightings: Moorland zone of Kilimanjaro’s slopes

 

White-necked Raven

Sightings: Moorland zone of Kilimanjaro’s slopes

 

Alpine Chat

Sightings: Moorland zone of Kilimanjaro’s slopes

 

Dusky Turtle Doves

Sighting: Alpine zone of Kilimanjaro’s slopes

 

Southern Ground Hornbill

Sightings: Lake Manyara NP

 

Saddle Billed Stork

Sightings: Lake Manyara NP

 

Grey Heron

Sightings: Lake Manyara NP

 

African Jacana

Sightings: Lake Manyara NP

 

African Spoonbill

Sightings: Lake Manyara NP

 

Cattle Egret

Sightings: Lake Manyara NP

 

African Swamphen

Sightings: Lake Manyara NP

 

Hadada Ibis

Sightings: Lake Manyara NP

 

Squacco Heron

Sightings: Lake Manyara NP

 

Von Der Decken’s Hornbill

Sightings: Lake Manyara NP

 

Helmeted Guinea Fowl

Sightings: Lake Manyara NP

 

Ring-necked Dove

Sightings: Lake Manyara NP

 

Flamingo

Sightings: Lake Manyara NP, Ngorongoro Conservation Area

 

African Fish Eagle

Sightings: Lake Manyara NP

 

Egyptian Goose

Sightings: Lake Manyara NP

 

African Pied Kingfisher

Sightings: Lake Manyara NP

 

Common Sandpiper

Sightings: Lake Manyara NP, Serengeti NP

 

Grey Crowned Crane

Sightings: Lake Manyara NP, Ngorongoro Conservation Area

 

Speckled Mousebird

Sightings: Lake Manyara NP, Ngorongoro Conservation Area

 

Tawny Eagle

Sightings: Ngorongoro Conservation Area, Serengeti NP

 

Marabou Stork

Sightings: Ngorongoro Conservation Area

 

Ostrich

Sightings: Serengeti NP, Ngorongoro Conservation Area

 

Caped Wheatear

Sightings: Serengeti NP

 

Superb Starling

Sightings: Serengeti NP

 

Oxpecker

Sightings: Serengeti NP

 

Hooded Vulture

Sightings: Serengeti NP

 

Finch

Sightings: Serengeti NP

 

African Black-winged Stilt

Sightings: Serengeti NP

 

 

Shrike

Sightings: Serengeti NP

 

Red-winged Starling

Sightings: Ngorongoro Conservation Area

 

Abdim’s Stork

Sightings: Ngorongoro Conservation Area

 

 

REPTILES AND OTHERS

Long-tailed Admiral Butterfly

Sightings: Ngorongoro Conservation Area

 

Mwanza Flat-headed Agama Lizard

Sightings: Serengeti NP

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